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Now Available: Dataset for UK Survey of Academics 2015 at ICPSR

Earlier this year we partnered with Jisc and Research Libraries UK (RLUK) for the second cycle of the UK Survey of Academics to understand the research and teaching attitudes and practices of academics in the UK higher education sector. Key findings from this snapshot of national findings included: A substantial increase in the of respondents that preserves their research data in a repository and a corresponding decrease in the share that preserves data themselves An increase in the share of respondents that receive assistance making their research outputs freely available online UK respondents more frequently share findings freely available online,…


Breaking the Luxury Barrier
On Fostering Exploratory Qualitative Research in Libraries

How should qualitative research be incorporated into a library’s research agenda? In the latest issue of Weave: Journal of Library Experience “provocateur anthropologists” Donna Lanclos and Andrew Asher reflect on the state of ethnographic research in libraries, which they characterize as more “ethnographish” than ethnographic. Some of the trappings of ethnographish library research include that the projects are: smaller scale, rely on “pre-packaged” methods, and aim towards solving institution-specific problems. In contrast, drawing on their experiences as full-time anthropologists employed in libraries, Donna and Andrew advocate for more ethnographic research in libraries, which would involve sustained and open exploration not geared…


Developing a Policy for Technology-Mediated Content

As colleges and universities continue to develop and invest in online courses, have their policies kept pace? In An Academic Policy Framework for Technology-Mediated Content, published today, authors Randal C. Picker, Lawrence S. Bacow, and Nancy Kopans argue that clear policies—on governance, conflicts of interest, and intellectual property—are critical to promoting innovation in the development of new educational technologies. As the authors caution “without adequate policies, the development of potentially interesting and valuable new educational technologies [may] be stifled by uncertainties as well as possible tensions between the roles of faculty and administration.” In our work with the Council of…


Now Available: Dataset for US Faculty Survey 2015 at ICPSR

Earlier this year we published findings from the US Faculty Survey 2015. We have been running this survey on a triennial basis since 2000 to examine the attitudes and behaviors of scholars at four-year colleges and universities across the United States. The survey provides the higher education community with a regularly updated snapshot of its faculty members at a moment in time, as well as trend analysis of changes. Key findings from this latest snapshot of national findings include: Reversing a trend we saw in 2012, the library catalog/website is increasingly important for faculty as they conduct their research There…


Shaping a Library by Linking Planning and Budgeting

The Charleston Conference last week featured a plenary address from Jim Neal, Columbia University’s former library director and the ALA president-elect. Jim spoke about his views on the changing nature of libraries and offered a series of “commandments” about how libraries can and should evolve going forward. Among many other observations based on his years of experience in academic research libraries, Jim emphasized his views that strategic planning processes fail us too often, that we need fewer ideas and stronger execution, and that resource allocations are of greater importance than planning. I strongly agree that the budget is a better…