S+R Blog

Addressing the current issues that impact higher education.

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August 03, 2015

Notes from the Northumbria Conference

Alisa Rod and I had the pleasure of attending the 11th Northumbria International Conference on Performance Measurement in Libraries and Information Services, a biennial meeting held this year in Edinburgh, Scotland. Many people think of the Northumbria Conference as the British complement to the ARL Library Assessment Conference held in the US. The conference venue, Our Dynamic Earth, put us in the middle of excited children exploring oceans and rainforests on the one side and a spectacular view of Arthur’s Seat on the other.
 
Following a Read More...

August 03, 2015

Nancy Fried Foster

July 30, 2015

Two Online Learning Markets

The discussion about MOOCs and their impact on higher education has changed dramatically in the last couple of years. The fear and foreboding that accompanied MOOCs’ explosive debut has dissipated. It seems that the MOOC storm has passed.  
 
Much of that hype was predicated on the expectation that these new free courses were going to replace traditionally delivered higher education and reduce the price of pursuing degrees. There was also a belief that these courses would undermine or “unbundle” the traditional courseload and curriculum at Read More...

July 30, 2015

Kevin M. Guthrie

July 29, 2015

Diversity in American Art Museums

Over the past  year, Liam Sweeney, Deanna Marcum, and I have been working on a project with Mariët Westermann of The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to examine the diversity of the staff of America's art museums. Today, Mellon has published an introduction and overview of the diversity findings of the members of the Association of Art Museum Directors.  
 
In this project, we worked closely with the Association and its members to develop a questionnaire about staff diversity. Because the project is based on data that museums are likely already to Read More...

July 29, 2015

Roger C. Schonfeld

July 27, 2015

The Importance of Social Factors in Student-College Match

In a new NBER working paper released this month, economists from the University of Texas and Texas A&M scrutinize some of the factors motivating racial and ethnic differences in college application choices, using data from the entire population of high school graduates in Texas over the past two years. In disaggregating rather than lumping together minorities (as some other studies do), the authors find that Hispanic students are in particular less likely to apply to any college, even after controlling for college readiness and high school Read More...

July 27, 2015

D. Derek Wu

July 15, 2015

What Does the Future of Higher Education Look Like? It Depends Where You Sit

As part of a panel organized for the recent annual conference of the American Library Association in San Francisco, I was invited to talk about future trends in higher education. This was something of a fool’s errand, I realize, since we are bombarded every day by the media with higher education’s most pressing challenges and opportunities: 
 
Low completion rates
New pedagogies that meet more of today’s students’ needs—online learning, competency-based education, etc.
Need for a higher education ecosystem that allows students to carry with Read More...

July 15, 2015

Deanna Marcum

July 13, 2015

Designing and Governing Library Collaborations

I was recently recalling a fantastic study by Ralph Wagner on The History of the Farmington Plan. It reviewed some of the most important efforts at collaboration among the US research libraries, especially in the post-war period, and analyzed their successes and eventual demise. I thought of this book as I was wondering if anyone has done a serious examination of collaboration in research university libraries. 
 
Cultures of collaboration, and their reflection in organizational design and governance, were on my mind when I was writing the talk Read More...

July 13, 2015

Roger C. Schonfeld

July 13, 2015

The Student Swirl Becoming More of a Norm in Higher Ed

The concept of the “student swirl” was conceived in the 1980s to describe undergraduates who moved among institutions before earning a bachelor’s degree. Students who transferred often did so because they made a poor initial match with an institution, or encountered academic or financial problems along the way.   
 
But now there is a growing body of evidence that students might be making a deliberate choice to transfer institutions as part of their pathway to a bachelor’s degree. 
 
First there is the report released last week from the Read More...

July 13, 2015

Jeffrey J. Selingo

July 10, 2015

Resources for Reinvestment in Academic Libraries

At ALA Annual in San Francisco last month, one of the interesting panels that I attended featured the executive leadership of six library technology companies. The moderator, Marshall Breeding, started things off with a question about how each company’s business model helped it serve library needs. OCLC’s Skip Prichard spoke about his organization’s governance as a partnership of libraries, while ProQuest’s Kurt Sanford emphasized that because it is family-owned his organization can take a long-term perspective. I found it especially Read More...

July 10, 2015

Roger C. Schonfeld

July 08, 2015

How Can We Replicate the Positive Effects of Siblings on College Choices?

A recent study by Joshua Goodman, Michael Hurwitz, Jonathan Smith, and Julia Fox explores the relationship between siblings’ college choices. Using data from 1.6 million pairs of siblings who took the SAT between 2004 and 2011 they find that 31% of younger siblings apply to and 19% enroll in the same college as their older sibling. They also find that younger siblings are 16 percentage points more likely than their high school peers to enroll in four-year colleges if their older siblings do so first, and 19 percentage points more likely to Read More...

July 08, 2015

Christine Mulhern

July 08, 2015

Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation

How do we ensure the long-term preservation of our print heritage even as our collections move more fully online?
 
In "Taking Stock: Sharing Responsibility for Print Preservation," Roger Schonfeld surveys the progress our community has made in the past decade, but warns against the conflation of collaborative print management and improved access to collections with preservation. 
 
While "we may have developed a strong network for managing down print, Schonfeld argues, "whether that will yield long-term preservation goals is quite another Read More...

July 08, 2015

Roger C. Schonfeld

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